• Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects
    • Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects
    • Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects
    • Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects
    • Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects
    • Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects
    • Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects
    • Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects
    • Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects
    • Architectural photography of heritage modernist project Dublin Ireland Berkeley Library Trinity College Dublin ABK Architects

    From Box to Anti-Box

    Berkeley Library celebrates its 50th construction Anniversary . From Box to anti-box investigates the construction and design process of this important building. Curated by Donal Hickey Architect the exhibition collects drawings from the Architectural Archive along with archival photographs and contemporary photographs. The contemporary photographs were produced by Paul Tierney Photography as part of a project researching twentieth century architecture commissioned by Dublin City Council. The photographs of the present day building augment the original construction photographs . John Donal also provides architectural images of the completed project. This images date from the late 1960’s. Of interest in this exhibition is the parallel development of Chandigarh in India by LeCorbusier and also the comparision with the adjacent Museum building by Deane and Woodword( link to Museum Building )

    The exhibition runs in the Architecture Gallery of the Irish Architectural Archive from Thursday 12 October 2017 to Friday 5 January 2018. The Architecture Gallery is open to the public from 10am to 5pm, Tuesdays to Fridays.

    More details here.

    From Box to Anti-Box: the Berkeley Library at 50

    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney
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    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney

    Architectural Photography of Passive House Portmarnack

    Passive house plus ( a really excellent magazine) recently published some images of a passive house by OA studios in Portmarnock. The Architectural Technologist and designer Des Crabbe explains the design and construction of the house in the lastest edition of Passive house Plus (issue 23). The images turned out well showing panoramic views of Lambay island and the sea. The house is constructed of clay blocks. The contractors were Pannocelt ltd. For information of green technology , passive house and good coverage of construction and the environment Passive house Plus is highly recommended.

    More details can be found in Passive house Plus

    https://www.pannoncelt.com/

    http://www.oastudios.ie/

    https://passivehouseplus.ie/

    • Existing stair newel post of Dublin Tenement house showing the existing condition of the building
    • paul tierney
    • photography of door in tenement museum dublin
    • photograph of restoration conservation of historic property in dublin tenement house
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    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney

    Tenement Museum 14 Henrietta Street Dublin

    The Tenement Museum situated on Henrietta street Dublin. The building was built in 1748 by Luke Gardiner who had acted as a developer for much of the Georgian City. After the act of union in 1801 the house became offices for the legal profession. The house became a tenement in 1883 with 17 Families, it remained a tenement until the 1970s . A more complete explanation of the project is given in this Irish Times article. The photographs of the project show the modern additions aswell as the existing condition of the building. The building images distinguish between the new interventions and the existing fabric. An interesting aspect of the pictures is that they reveal layers of occupation over time. Wireless switches and routers were used in the building to minimise the alteration of the material. The floor void was used to incorporate fire protection, heating, network services and structure. This was to minimise the disruption of the fabric.

    The project is an essay in contemporary conservation, restoration and preservation. It is a testament to grand vision of  Dublin City Councils Heritage Department.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/museum-of-dublin-tenement-life-set-for-henrietta-street-1.2194311

    www.tenementmuseum.ie/

    https://shaffrey-architects.squarespace.com

    https://shaffrey-architects.squarespace.com/henrietta-street

    • Art photography interior exhibition bray
    • Art photography interior exhibition bray
    • Art photography interior exhibition bray
    • Art photography interior exhibition bray
    • Art photography interior exhibition bray
    • Art photography interior exhibition bray

    The Spaces of the Imagination at the Mermaid Arts centre

    Recent art photography for Melissa O’Faherty for her exhibition ” The Spaces of the imagination”. This was a very compelling exhibition. Melissa has an interest in photography and her artwork engages in ideas of scale and space. Thematically it was interesting to photograph photography and work with the ideas that were presented by the exhibition.  This is the text from the exhibition: This is her first solo show at Mermaid Arts Centre. While Melissa is trained in the classical skills of drawing the main focus of her artistic practice is exploring and pushing the boundaries and physical materials of drawing. Her work process is both experimental and focused.

    For her upcoming show at Mermaid called “ The Spaces of the Imagination’, she exhibits visual diaries which look at the drawing thought process and also new work which imagines the environments of new planetary worlds where the scientific actuality and the artistic imagination may meet.

  • Photographing houses, houses for photographers

    The Shortlist for the sterling prize was recently released. The list has a diversity of projects from a University campus to Hastings pier to the British Museum Conservation and Exhibitions centre. One project that I thought was interesting was the RIBA London Award 2017 and RIBA London Building of the Year 2017 Award which went to the photography studio and house for Juergen Teller by 6a architects.

    The architects describe the project as “The project expertly exploits a typically London condition. Constrained by a long and narrow industrial plot at the rougher edge of Ladbroke Grove; its only face nestles between cheap developer housing, an industrial estate and the hinterland of the Westway.”

    This poises a question, what should a house for a photographer look like. Or should a photographers house reflect their equipment, their culture , their influence.

    From the photographs shown the project seems blank out the context. The project forms two courtyards that protect the studios from the outside. Is there a metaphor of some sort in the planning. It seems that the main accommodation is like a gatehouse over the entrance to the studio. So in this model of housing? The work is placed at the figurative  and literal centre of the plan. Is this a message to the world? from Teller. Maybe! To celebrate the completion Juergen presented a self portrait in the space! The man at work!

    Recent winners of the sterling prize such as David Chipperfield could inform this view. Chipperfield won the prize in 2007 for The Museum of Modern Literature in Marbach am Neckar, Germany. His private house in Richmond for Nick Knight in 1998-2001 is an essay in cool articulation of a suburban dwelling. It masks the original form of the house build by Knights father. The impression created is distant from the flamboyant anarchy of Knights photography. The connection between what knight creates at www.showstudio.com and his house seem distant.

    One aspect of the house that appeals to me is the concession to the clients profession in the use of a “framing portal” .The portal connects elements of the architectural composition together. It also “frames” a view of the garden from the interiors. The frame acknowledges what the photographer does without making a literal translation of a camera.

    In both projects the aesthetics are quite similar; In situ concrete, plaster, block-work , a subdued palette of tones, rigid geometry. The outcomes are quite different. Tellers house, places him a “hero” with his work at the centre of the world. Nick Knights house seems more to be a refuge from which to view the world.

    The RIBA Stirling List

    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing
    • Kavanagh Tuite Best Sustainable Building RIAI Awards Roebuck Students Housing

    Student Housing

    Student housing continues to expand as a building type in the city. In this gallery there are examples housing in Roebuck Student housing Belfield. The current gallery shows examples of the digihub student housing off Thomas street also. Designed by O’Mahony Pike and built by Bennett construction the project looks like a prototype for much of the new student accommodation in the city. New projects are being built on Dorset street ( H.J. Lyons Architects) and there are huge developments in the Blackpitts / Tenters area of the city. A welcome factor is that many of the projects are being developed on sites that lay idle for many years. The Dublin Inquirer provide this assessment of the new landscape of student housing.

    • paul tierney
    • paul tierney

    Architectural Interior photography In Dublin

    Some recent Architectural Photography featured in the Sunday Times Magazine in May. The project was for Gottstein Architects showing a recent refurbishment and renovation of the project in south Dublin. The link to the article :Sunday Times Article

    Gottstein Architects shown in Sunday Times Architecture Feature

    Feature on Gottstein Architects Sunday Times May 2017

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    Hooper Palmerstown

    Palmerstown Veterinary Clinic evocative of an Edward Hooper Painting. A bit of diversion from the usual architectural image.

    Edward Hooper evocation palmerstown veterinary hospital

  • front over details of shooting space book

    Shooting Space: Architecture in Contemporary Photography Elia Redstone

    Shooting Space is an anthology that examines the relationship between photographers and architecture. The book is divided into five parts that presents a vary of approach’s to the subject. The first chapter is prefaced by Julius Schulman quote:
    “ I sell architecture better and more directly and more vividly than the architect does” .
    This sets the tone for much of the book. It also highlights the problem of how architecture is represented. The images from this chapter avoid the conventions of blues skies, vertical lines , perfect context etc. Of interest are images by Iwan Bann and Michele Nastasi.

    The book is representative of the global architecture covering Asia, Europe, The Americas and Middle East. Africa is not represented extensively. Work by Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse on Ponte city could have address this imbalance. The book Ponte city was published in 2014 however most of the photographers were from 2008 onwards.

    Michael Wolf , Thomas Struth and Nuno Cera feature in the “Cityscapes of change” chapter. The project “Architecture of Density” by Michael Wolf showcases the density of development in Hong Kong. Thomas Struth documents cities in his “Unconscious Places” project. The series seeks to encapsulate the sense of a place in a single image. Nuno Ceras’ images investigate the physical and metaphorical nature of space. The images present layers images of reflections from high rise hotel rooms. Sze Tsung Leong visual documentation of China are very compelling also.

    Man-altered Landscapes catalogues work by Peter Bialobrzeski , Nadav Kander, and Armin Linke amongst others. The project “Architecture of Authority “ by Richard Ross is also featured. The images is “explore the nature of institutionalized space” and present an architecture that shows the “failure of moderation, politics….humanity”.

    The strongest parts of the book show photographers working in a documentary tradition. The chapters on conceptual photography speak less about “Shooting space” and are more concerned with creating new visual spaces. Typically, the images are made by digital manipulation of some sort. Overall the book presents a good anthology of photographers and their approach to photographing the city.

    http://uk.phaidon.com/store/architecture/shooting-space-9780714867427/

    Iwan Bann http://iwan.com/iwan_index.php
    Michele Nastasi http://www.michelenastasi.com/
    Micheal Wolf http://photomichaelwolf.com/#architecture-of-density-2/1
    Thomas Struth http://www.thomasstruth32.com/bigsize/index.html
    Nuno Cera http://www.nunocera.com/
    Sze Tsung Leong http://www.szetsungleong.com/
    Nadav Kander http://www.nadavkander.com/
    Armin Linke http://www.arminlinke.com/
    Peter Bialobreski http://www.bialobrzeski.de/work/paradise_now/ParadiseNow-18.html
    Richard Ross http://richardross.net/
    Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse http://www.subotzkystudio.com/

  • Bathing places and fixtures designed by Herbert Simms and others 1911-1958

    More Than Concrete Blocks

    More than Concrete Blocks: Dublin City’s twentieth-century buildings was launched with great excitement last week. The book is the culmination of almost five years of work. Most of the new architectural photography was commissioned by Dublin City Council for this project. The book provides an authoritative account of Dublin’s social, cultural and political history. The built history is used as evidence in the account of the century. The book is a brilliant and entertaining guide to the 20th century Dublin. It is a must have for anyone interested in Dublin, Architecture and any type of social History

    More than Concrete Blocks: Dublin City’s twentieth-century buildings is a three-volume series of architectural history books which are richly illustrated and written for the general reader. Unpacking the history of Dublin’s architecture during the twentieth century, each book covers a period in chronological sequence: Volume I, 1900–40; Volume II, 1940–73; Volume III, 1973–2000. The series considers the city as a layers and complex place. It makes links between Dublin’s buildings and Dublin’s political, social, cultural and economic histories.

    http://www.fourcourtspress.ie/books/2016/more-than-concrete-blocks/